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Kaiser, NorthShore hospitals reach HIMSS Stage 7

The first-ever list of “Stage 7” hospitals is out, and it includes 15 facilities, but just organizations: Kaiser Permanente and NorthShore University HealthSystem, formerly known as Evanston Northwestern Healthcare.

HIMSS Analytics said that 12 Kaiser hospitals in California and all three NorthShore acute care facilities in the suburbs of Chicago reached the top level of EMR implementation on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model. That means they are effectively paperless, can share patient data with other organizations by sending standardized electronic transactions and are able to mine their clinical databases for quality improvement.

The Kaiser Stage 7 hospitals are:

  • South San Francisco Medical Center (127 Beds)
  • South Sacramento Medical Center (228 Beds)
  • Sacramento Medical Center (331 Beds)
  • Roseville Medical Center (166 Beds)
  • Modesto Medical Center (220 Beds)
  • Manteca Hospital (77 Beds)
  • Walnut Creek Medical Center (229 Beds)
  • Antioch Medical Center (130 Beds)
  • Hayward Medical Center (200 Beds)
  • Fremont Medical Center (106 Beds)
  • Santa Rosa Medical Center (112 Beds)
  • Irvine Medical Center (150 Beds)

NorthShore University HealthSystem includes:

  • Evanston Hospital (389 Beds)
  • Glenbrook Hospital (143 Beds)
  • Highland Park Hospital (211 Beds)

A cousin of mine is expecting to give birth at Evanston Hospital in late April. I’m happy to know she’ll be in good hands.

March 9, 2009 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Up to speed on CCHIT controversy

We may have a definitive account on the recent controversy about the Certification Commission for Healthcare Information Technology and its relationship with the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. I sure hope it’s definitive, because it’s a story I wrote for Healthcare IT News—my first byline in that publication after several years of working for a competing publication that’s no longer around.

Having to hew to actual journalistic standards rather than the lawless nature of the blogosphere, I did not name “Calvin Jablonski,” “Rocky Ostrand” or “Maggiemae Ph.D.” in the article because I was unable to confirm those identities. In fact, the Jablonski and Maggiemae comments were so similar in language and tone that I suspect they might be from the same person. I also wonder if “Rocky Ostrand” wasn’t somehow a play on the name of Racquel Orenick, corporate counsel of HIMSS, whom I quoted in the story.

I also left out of the story some of the more incendiary comments from the pseudononymous critic or critic, but included the critiques of those willing to go on the record with their real names.

I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.