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Some truths about health IT and innovation

This morning at the annual SAS Health Analytics Executive Conference in Cary, N.C., former national health IT coordinator Dr. Farzad Mostashari dubbed Dr. Eric Topol “the high priest of personalized medicine.”

That reminded me of an e-mail I received a couple weeks ago, suggesting that someone should start a blog called, “What’s Eric Saying?” As this correspondent explained it, all you need to do is read Topol’s Twitter stream to know where health IT and the practice of medicine are headed. I checked it out. It’s true.

Some examples:

 

 

 

And that’s just since Monday.

Meanwhile, Mostashari added some truisms himself this morning. “Med speed is slow. Tech speed is fast,” he said, apparently paraphrasing current TEDMED owner Jay Walker. Then, speaking as a physician, Mostashari said, “Most of what determines our outcomes isn’t what happens in our office.” Which is kind of what Topol has been trying to get across for several years.

If only the financial incentives would encourage care outside the office, we might be getting somewhere. It’s starting to happen, but, as it says above, med speed is slow.

May 14, 2014 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Health eVillages is Monday’s AOL ’cause of the day’

Health eVillages, which I am on the advisory board of, has been selected as AOL’s “Cause of the Day” for Monday. That means it’s highlighted on the home page of AOL. If you have an old smartphone you’re not using, donate it to Health eVillages and help save a life. Thanks.

September 17, 2012 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Among docs, mobility is global

I’m thinking that the m0bile physician is a global phenomenon.

I get on a lot of ridiculously misguided mailing lists (I’ll post an example right after this). One I just received while up writing at 1:30 a.m. was an invitation to take part in a physician survey about mobile technology. Once again, I am not a physician. But before I click the unsubscribe link, I decided to take a look at the survey itself.

The survey, from a custom publishing house in the United Arab Emirates (yeah, I am on a lot of weird mailing lists), asks doctors about tablets, smartphones and their use of social media. I include the link only because I am interested in seeing the results. Are doctors in other parts of the world adopting mobile devices as quickly as U.S. physicians? Is this trend limited to industrialized countries, or do physicians in somewhat wealthy, non-Western lands such as the UAE and other oil-rich states also love tablets and smartphones?

If anyone else has any insight from outside North America, Western Europe and other rich countries like Japan and Australia, please share in the comment section.

December 12, 2011 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.