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Join me for some upcoming speaking gigs

Hey all. I bet you thought I abandoned this blog when I took the job with MedCity News in April. I kind of did, because this is a health IT blog, and the people who pay my salary want me covering health IT exclusively for them. However, I’m allowed to promote myself, so promote I shall. As a bonus, all of what I’m about to tell you is related to health IT, which is why you came here in the first place.

I’ve got several speaking gigs coming up next month. Some are open to the public, others are not.

  • Oct. 1, I will moderate a panel discussing trends in patient engagement as part of the kickoff event for the new Chicago chapter of Health Technology Forum. RSVP here for the event, which starts at 6 pm CDT at SAS Institute’s Chicago office, Two Prudential Plaza, 180 N. Stetson Ave., Suite 1600. Panelists TBA.
  • Oct. 7, I will be at the Surescripts 2015 Customer Forum in Alexandria, Va., on a panel hosted by Surescripts CEO Tom Skelton. I’ll be joined by my friends Mandi Bishop of Dell and Shahid Shah, a.k.a. the Healthcare IT Guy, to discuss interoperability. That session runs 8:30-9:15 a.m. EDT.
  • Oct. 26, I am scheduled to be on a panel called “The Intersection of Digital Health and Patient Centricity,” alongside Sean Katz, CIO of the Vitality Group, and Maryam Saleh, director of member experience at health technology incubator Matter. That’s hosted by marketing firm APCO Worldwide, and starts at 5:30 p.m. CDT in the Wacker Room of the CME Building, 10 S. Wacker Drive, Suite 1200, Chicago.

Perhaps I’ll see you at one or more of those.

September 18, 2015 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Loudmouth patients, in their own words

The video from the Digital Health Summit session, “Loudmouth Patients: Making Noise and Making Change,” that I moderated in January has been posted. It was a lively, fascinating discussion involving: empowered patient Hugo Campos; Donna Cryer, CEO of the Global Liver Institute (and a liver transplant recipient herself); and Greg Matthews, group director of  interactive and social media at WCG.

Unfortunately, one long-winded questioner from the audience took up all the Q&A time (and I initially mistook her for Bettina Experton of Humetrix), so some things went unanswered. If you have any questions for the participants, post them in the comments below and I will attempt to get the panelists to answer.

This discussion took place Jan. 8 at the Digital Health Summit at International CES in Las Vegas.

In case you missed it, here are some post-session interviews with Campos, Matthews and myself.

February 13, 2014 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Digital Health Summit videos: Loudmouth patients

As I noted last week, I moderated a panel at the Digital Health Summit at International CES on “loudmouth patients.” Aside from a slight technical glitch in which the “Seinfeld” clip I shared here didn’t play during the presentation and me misidentifying an audience questioner, it was, IMHO, one of the best sessions of the two-day conference. As the moderator, I owe that to my panelists.

Hugo Campos and Donna Cryer told their compelling stories, while Greg Matthews discussed some new research he did, looking for patterns in online physician-patient interactions.

Afterward, video producer Tim Reha pulled each of us aside to chat on camera for “Digital Health Summit Live” interviews. I talked, possibly awkwardly, about what the other panelists said during the session, then they told their own stories in far more detail and precision than I could offer. I have to say I deftly positioned myself as an empowered, loudmouth patient myself. My physicians, consider yourself warned.

 

Here’s Campos discussing his compelling story:

 

And Matthews explains his research:

If any video of Cryer surfaces, I will be sure to add it.

January 13, 2014 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Patients raise their voices at CES

I’m about to escape the frigid winter blast in Chicago, a.k.a., Chiberia, for the relative warmth of Las Vegas (it will be below 40 degrees Fahrenheit at night, so it’s not exactly tropical there either) and the Digital Health Summit at International CES. On Wednesday afternoon at 4:10 p.m. PST, I will be moderating a panel called “Loudmouth Patients: Making Noise and Making Change.” Panelists will include: well-known empowered patient — and pain in Medtronic’s behindHugo Campos; Donna Cryer, CEO of the Global Liver Institute (and a liver transplant recipient herself); and Greg Matthews, group director of  interactive and social media at WCG.

I’m giving just a short intro since the session is only 30 minutes long, though I do intend to give a condensed version of the story of how I had to raise my voice in support of my dad, who was rendered unable to speak by a rare disease as he was dying — and being badly mistreated — in an ill-equipped and poorly run hospital less than two years ago.

Hopefully soon we can all speak up to our healthcare providers without being blacklisted like Seinfeld’s Elaine back in the 1990s (h/t Brian Ahier).

Speaking of patients getting a look at their medical records, I’m also working on a story for U.S, News & World Report about the pros and cons of the OpenNotes project. Stay tuned for that one hopefully later this month.

January 6, 2014 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.