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Networking, socially

You may have noticed, since the Digital HealthCare & Productivity gig dried up for me a few weeks ago, I’ve been posting more often to this blog. The posts also have been reasonably short. I’m kind of experimenting to see what kind of traffic I get with regular posts.

Now here’s something to get people talking: A collection of Facebook groups for HIT and healthcare quality that I’ve come across recently. All these are open groups; I can’t get into the invitation-only ones anyway. This is by no means exhaustive.

In no particular order:

AMIA – American Medical Informatics Association
American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 10×10
Asia Pacific Association for Medical Informatics (APAMI)
IMIA (International Medical Informatics Association)
AHIMA
Canadian Health Information Management Association (CHIMA)
Health Informatics
Health2.0–User Generated Healthcare
Health 2.0
Medicine 2.0
HIMSS
Evidence-based medicine
La Télémédecine mérite mieux. Telemedicine deserves a future.
Medbloggers
Medical Informatics
Empower Patients
Institute for Healthcare Improvement
Bioinformatica en Español

And because Dr. Bill Hersh of Oregon Health and Science University asked nicely, here’s the fan page for the OHSU-AMIA 10×10 Program.

Dr. Hersh also had a letter to the editor published in The Oregonian on Sunday, in which he promoted health IT as a job-creation engine for any economic stimulus that the new Congress might consider in 2009.

December 16, 2008 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

HIT advertising section in Friday’s Washington Post

There’s a special advertising pull-out section on healthcare IT running in Friday’s print edition of the Washington Post. How do I know this? Because I wrote the majority of it. I also helped with the questions posed to the “panel of experts.”

Normally I would not get involved in marketing communications, but I had pretty good editorial control over the message. I was instructed to interview representatives of the advertisers, whose quotes were to appear on the same page as their ads—normally a red flag for me—but I could add any additional information or interviews that I saw necessary. Furthermore, the advertisers did not have authority to review the copy prior to publication, so I was satisfied with the arrangements. I only had to answer to the publisher, Mediaplanet, a Swedish marketing firm with U.S. headquarters in New York. So overall, I was comfortable with the arrangements. Plus, it gets me in the Washington Post, even if it was through the back door.

For what it’s worth, you’ll note that the EMR story features a company that does not have CCHIT certification for its product. I’ll also admit that I didn’t address the security issues related to health IT.

Click here for a PDF of the section (1.2 MB). I understand it will not be available at WashingtonPost.com.

I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.