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Certification in EHR and HIT

A group calling itself Health IT Certification and backed by an advisory board filled with health IT luminaries has launched professional certification programs in electronic health records and health information technology.

Those who complete training programs will be designated certified professionals in health information technology (CPHIT) or certified professionals in electronic health records (CPEHR).

Certification training programs are scheduled for Jan. 24-26 in Las Vegas, Feb. 28-March 2 in Orlando and March 21-23 in Chicago. The organization also offers online training.

The advisory board for the two certifications include: URAC President Garry Carneal; CareGroup Healthcare System CIO John Halamka, M.D.; MGMA President William Jessee, M.D.; and eHealth Initiative CEO Janet Marchibroda.

Health IT Certification is affiliated with Health Care Conference Administrators, a Yucca Valley, Calif., company that has put on such events as the National HIPAA Summit, the Health Information Technology Summit and The Emerging Technologies and Healthcare Innovations Congress (TETHIC).

November 29, 2004 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

New developments

A lot has happened in the area of connectivity since I last posted, some of which you probably know, some of which hopefully will be news to you as you read this.

  • The Department of Veterans Affairs (NOT the “Veterans Administration,” as some people still say, even though the name was changed in 1989) has launched its long-awaited personal health record as part of the year-old My HealtheVet portal. I’m interested in seeing the registration numbers after the first six months.

I have submitted a story for the January edition of that publication’s new Technology for Doctors supplement.

I’ll see you in a couple of weeks at the annual Radiological Society of North America meeting here in Chicago.

November 15, 2004 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.

Flu shots

Just in case anyone was interested, the following is something I sent to the Association of Health Care Journalists listserv last week. It’s not directly related to IT, but technology sure would help identify those most at risk for the flu, or any other large-scale public health issue, for that matter.

For the record, I didn’t get any hate mail from this one. :-)

Perhaps it’s because I focus on the business side of health rather than clinical/medical issues, or maybe because I have a pretty good immune system and also despise needles, but is there something I am not understanding about this whole controversy with flu shots?

When all of us — including this 30-something youngster — were growing up, there was no flu vaccine. Even until the last five years or so, only a small portion of the population got the shot. Now, even with some 58 million doses available nationwide, plus about 6 million FluMist doses, there’s pandemonium in the streets because 40 million people will have to go without. When exactly did it become necessary for 100 million Americans to get innoculated against the flu? It seems like people did just fine a decade ago with acetaminophen and cough syrup. If expectations had been lower for the availability of a vaccine, would there be so much public outcry?

Bracing for the incoming barrage of name-calling,

Neil

November 1, 2004 I Written By

I'm a freelance healthcare journalist, specializing in health IT, mobile health, healthcare quality, hospital/physician practice management and healthcare finance.